Stress Awareness Month 2019

Karin, April 1 2019

For stress awareness month we have put together three booklists offering different types of techniques and advice in how to cope and overcome stress.
One list is for all adults, one is aimed at parents and carers and the third is for children and teens.

The first step is always the hardest, these books could help you take those steps.

Adult booklist,


The stress test
by Ian Robertson

The difference between too much pressure and too little can result in either debilitating stress or enduring demotivation in extreme situations. However, the right level of challenge and stress can help people to flourish and achieve more than they ever thought possible. In ‘The Stress Test’, Ian Robertson, armed with over four decades of research, reveals how we can shape our brain’s response to pressure and answers the question: can stress ever be a good thing?


The relaxation & stress reduction workbook
Martha Davis, Elizabeth Robbins Eshelman and Matthew McKay

Each chapter of this workbook follows a practical format, including a history of the technique covered, symptom effectiveness, examples, checklist, further reading and homework.

Try the eBook


A life less stressed: the five pillars of health and wellness
by Ron Ehrlich

Life has never been more stressful. It is no coincidence that chronic degenerative disorders such as cancer, heart disease, autoimmune illnesses and mental health conditions are on the rise. But if we want to tackle them, we need to look beyond their symptoms. That is the message of dentist and health advocate Ron Ehrlich, who untangles how problems in one part of the body are intimately linked to the whole being.

Try the eBook


Is your job making you ill?
by Ellie Cannon

A book aimed at advising, calming and empowering anyone, at any level, who is suffering as a result of their job. Full of take-home pro-active messages, experiential advice and case studies from Dr Ellie Cannon’s clinical experience of the last decade.


Notes on a nervous planet
by Matt Haig

Rates of stress and anxiety are rising. A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives. We are more connected, yet feel more alone. And we are encouraged to worry about everything from world politics to our body mass index. How can we stay sane on a planet that makes us mad? How do we stay human in a technological world? How do we feel happy when we are encouraged to be anxious? After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, these questions became urgent matters of life and death for Matt Haig. And he began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him.

Try the eBook


Booklist for parents and carers,


Under pressure: confronting the epidemic of stress and anxiety in girls
by Lisa Damour

Though anxiety has risen among young people overall, recent research studies confirm that it has skyrocketed in girls since the turn of the century. So what’s to blame? And how can we help these girls? In the same engaging, anecdotal style and reassuring tone that won over thousands of readers of her first book, ‘Untangled’, clinical psychologist Lisa Damour starts by examining the science of stress and anxiety, then turns to the many facets of girls’ lives where stress hits them hard: the parental expectations they face at home, pressures at school, social anxiety among their peers, and on social media.


Help your child deal with stress – and thrive: the transformative power of self-reg
by Stuart Shanker

Stress can affect your child in many ways – whether it’s exam pressure, pressure exerted by friends online or in the playground, or related to health, with lack of sleep and anxiety at home contributing. This is a ground-breaking parenting book, in which Dr Stuart Shanker argues that by teaching children the art of self-regulation, it can transform their behaviour and help them to identify, talk about and manage their emotions. This leads to a harmonious home, and children who feel nurtured and supported.


Happy parent, happy child: a 10-step plan for a stress-free family life
by Dr Genevieve von Lob

We all know that raising happy, confident and resilient children can be a tough job in this fast-paced world – and there’s never any shortage of well-meaning advice on how to be a better parent. So, if you’re anxious and struggling to cope with the pressures of school and family life – or if you worry that you’re not doing enough to support your child through their problems – give yourself a break: this book outlines a genuinely practical 10-step plan for a stress-free family life.


Mindful parenting: find peace and joy through stress-free, conscious parenting
by Oli Doyle

Oli Doyle guides the reader through a six-week guide to show how mindfulness can help us be completely present in the messy reality that is parenting. The guide to making your parenting journey a means to achieve peace of mind will give parents the skills to enjoy every moment with their children.


The thriving child: the science behind reducing stress and nurturing independence
by Dr William Stixrud and Ned Johnson

As parents we all want the best for our children, but so often over-manage every aspect of their lives, leaving them overwhelmed, lacking motivation and at risk of mental health problems as adults. So how can we prevent this from happening? Over their combined sixty years of practice, William Stixrud, a clinical neuropsychologist, and Ned Johnson, the founder of an elite tutoring agency, have worked with thousands of children all facing this problem. In this ground-breaking book they will teach you how to set your child on the real road to success.

Try the eAudiobook


Booklist for children and teens,


The teenage guide to stress
Nicola Morgan

Nicola Morgan is something of an authority on the teenage brain and is often invited to schools and colleges to speak on the subject. She came up with the idea of ‘The Teenage Guide to Stress’ because so many parents and teenagers contacted her for advice and help. The book is divided into three sections: Section one explains what stress is and looks at the ways teenage stress is different. Section two deals with a number of issues that affect teenagers – from anger, depression and sexual relationships to cyber-bullying, exams and eating disorders – and offers guidance and advice, as well as looking at how pre-existing conditions such as OCD and dyslexia are affected by adolescence. Section three is concerned with how to deal with and prevent the symptoms of stress, as well as healthy ways of looking after your mind and body.

Try the eBook


Fighting invisible tigers : stress management for teens
by Earl Hipp

Stress is something we all experience. But research suggests that adolescents are affected by it in unique ways that can increase impulsivity and risky behaviors. While eliminating stress from life isnt realistic, young people can learn to control how they respond to it. This book offers proven techniques that teens can use to deal with stressful situations in school, at home, and among friends. Theyll find current information on how stress affects health and decision making and learn stress-management skills to handle stress in positive waysincluding assertiveness, positive self-talk, time management, relaxation exercises, and much more. Filled with interesting facts, student quotes, and fun activities, this book is a great resource for any teen whos said, Im stressed out!


How not to lose it: mental health sorted
by Anna Williamson

The go-to mental health guide for kids! Exam stress? Friendship issues? Panic attacks? ‘How Not to Lose It’ will help you be the boss of all of this, and more. It’s not just your body that should be fit and healthy – your mind needs to be, too! ‘How Not to Lose It’ is the go-to guide for achieving a balanced mind and strong emotional well-being. With immediate, heart of the matter advice and a chatty yet honest tone, Anna Williamson addresses all of the key issues affecting children today.


Mental well-being and mindfulness 
by Katie Woolley

You can’t see mental wellbeing but you can feel it. Your mental wellbeing is all about how you think and feel. Some people call it ‘mental health’ or ’emotional wellbeing’. Having good mental health doesn’t mean being happy all the time. We all experience feelings of anger, sadness, fear and frustration. These feelings are perfectly normal. Mental wellbeing comes from finding positive ways to manage these feelings as you grow and develop. This simply written title explores what mental health is, why it is important and ways to deal with some mental health problems such as stress and anxiety.


 

Would you like to know more about stress, Mind UK can help and provide support for adults.

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